Growing, Pollination and Harvesting

Growing Gourds

Planting: 

The gourds need full sun and well drained soil, and lots water during the growing season. Sow the seeds outdoors after all danger of frost has passed and the weather is warm. Sow seeds 1-2 inches deep in groups of 4 seeds, spacing in groups 5 feet apart in rows spaced 8 feet apart.

Large gourds need lots of space. Place mounds at least 4 feet apart and make the rows 8 feet apart. Smaller gourds, such as bottle, dipper, birdhouse, and ornamentals, should be planted near a fence, trellis or arbor. They will need a place to hang. But they can also be on the ground. Gourds do cross pollinate easily and if you get “field grown seed”, you will get some of what you want and you might also have a very interesting collection of different shapes of gourds. Prepare the seed by soaking in water overnight or longer. Seeds may be clipped on the edges next to the point. These two steps hasten the germination time. Gourds are slow to germinate, taking anywhere from one to six weeks.Gourds do not like to have their roots disturbed and will be slow to begin growth. Plant the seeds to the depth of about time and a half the size of the seed. Though they are slow to get started, once the vine begins, you can almost watch the movement.

Growing Time: 

Gourds require a long growing season. Ornamentals need about 100 days from sprouting to maturity. Hardshells, Lagenaria, take 120-140 days, depending on the size and thickness of its shell. Luffas take 140 days. Luffas are slower to sprout and will mature late. Around September or October, stop watering altogether when the gourds are mature.  

Germination:

You can germinate you seeds by putting the seeds in water over night before planting. The seeds can also be germinated by putting them on a paper towel. lightly dampening the towel, place the towel in a zip lock bag. Cover the bag with a towel and place them in a cool dark place. check back every few day to see if the seeds have sprouted. When the seeds have sprouted. gently tear the paper towel apart. (do not tear the seeds off the towel this will rip the roots off, as the seed roots weave into the towel fiber.) Put the seed with the towel into the groud or in a pot to grow. watch the video and see how I do mine. Good luck planting and growing you gourds.

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Growing Gourds

Planting: 

The gourds need full sun and well drained soil, and lots water during the growing season. Sow the seeds outdoors after all danger of frost has passed and the weather is warm. Sow seeds 1-2 inches deep in groups of 4 seeds, spacing in groups 5 feet apart in rows spaced 8 feet apart.

Large gourds need lots of space. Place mounds at least 4 feet apart and make the rows 8 feet apart. Smaller gourds, such as bottle, dipper, birdhouse, and ornamentals, should be planted near a fence, trellis or arbor. They will need a place to hang. But they can also be on the ground. Gourds do cross pollinate easily and if you get “field grown seed”, you will get some of what you want and you might also have a very interesting collection of different shapes of gourds. Prepare the seed by soaking in water overnight or longer. Seeds may be clipped on the edges next to the point. These two steps hasten the germination time. Gourds are slow to germinate, taking anywhere from one to six weeks.Gourds do not like to have their roots disturbed and will be slow to begin growth. Plant the seeds to the depth of about time and a half the size of the seed. Though they are slow to get started, once the vine begins, you can almost watch the movement.

Growing Time: 

Gourds require a long growing season. Ornamentals need about 100 days from sprouting to maturity. Hardshells, Lagenaria, take 120-140 days, depending on the size and thickness of its shell. Luffas take 140 days. Luffas are slower to sprout and will mature late. Around September or October, stop watering altogether when the gourds are mature.  

Germination:

You can germinate you seeds by putting the seeds in water over night before planting. The seeds can also be germinated by putting them on a paper towel. lightly dampening the towel, place the towel in a zip lock bag. Cover the bag with a towel and place them in a cool dark place. check back every few day to see if the seeds have sprouted. When the seeds have sprouted. gently tear the paper towel apart. (do not tear the seeds off the towel this will rip the roots off, as the seed roots weave into the towel fiber.) Put the seed with the towel into the groud or in a pot to grow. watch the video and see how I do mine. Good luck planting and growing you gourds.

See how to germinate your gourd seeds. I place mine over the freezer where it’s nice and warm.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/gGsaW26or7jHv7ve7

Potential Problems:

Gourds usually have very little problems. But there are a few pests to look out for.

 Such as: 

Cucumber Beetles, Squash bugs, Squash vine borer, Cut worms, and Aphids are all possible pests. Gourds can also develop bacterial wilt. If the plant dies, take it out and treat the other vines. 

Gourd Pollination

Each gourd vine bears male and female flowers. The male flowers usually appear first. It is very easy to tell male from female flowers as the female flower will have the small gourd shape below the bloom, while the male flower ( photo at left is male flower ) grows on a stem without the ball shape below the flower.

The first vine that grows will generally have mostly male flowers, but you can make it produce more female flowers ( thus making more gourds ) by cutting the ends of the vine back.

 Gourds depend on insects such as bees and beetles for pollination.

Gourds belong to one of three types: hardshells, ornamentals or luffas. Luffas and ornamentals bear orange flowers that open during the day, while hardshells have night-blooming white flowers. The flowers of both types only stay open for less than 24 hours.

I usually take a small paint brush getting the pollen from the Male bloom. And shake lightly on the female bloom to transfer the pollen. Some will share the Male over the female bloom. But that might be hard if there is not a make bloom closed to the female

Then cover the bloom so the pollen will not blow away. I take the bloom closed easily. There are other technics that others use.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is pollination-1.jpg
To pollinate: shake the male bloom lightly over the female bloom, to drop the pollen onto the female. close up the femanle bloom so the pollne will not blow away.

Potential Problems:

Gourds usually have very little problems. But there are a few pests to look out for.

 Such as: 

Cucumber Beetles, Squash bugs, Squash vine borer, Cut worms, and Aphids are all possible pests. Gourds can also develop bacterial wilt. If the plant dies, take it out and treat the other vines. 

Gourd Pollination

Each gourd vine bears male and female flowers. The male flowers usually appear first. It is very easy to tell male from female flowers as the female flower will have the small gourd shape below the bloom, while the male flower ( photo at left is male flower ) grows on a stem without the ball shape below the flower.

The first vine that grows will generally have mostly male flowers, but you can make it produce more female flowers ( thus making more gourds ) by cutting the ends of the vine back.

 Gourds depend on insects such as bees and beetles for pollination.

Gourds belong to one of three types: hardshells, ornamentals or luffas. Luffas and ornamentals bear orange flowers that open during the day, while hardshells have night-blooming white flowers. The flowers of both types only stay open for less than 24 hours.

I usually take a small paint brush getting the pollen from the Male bloom. And shake lightly on the female bloom to transfer the pollen. Some will share the Male over the female bloom. But that might be hard if there is not a make bloom closed to the female

Then cover the bloom so the pollen will not blow away. I take the bloom closed easily. There are other technics that others use.

How To Grow And Care For Bottle Gourd | Gourds, Annual plants, How to make  compost
Male and Female gourd blooms

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